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What is a Still Target Shoot?

What's a Still Target Shoot?

Still target shooting is a shooting sport that has its origins in turkey hunting. Contestants sit, usually on a “low boy” stool, and shoot at a paper target 40 yards from the muzzle of the shotgun.

There are several “classes” in which shooters may participate.

12 Gauge Hunter,12 Gauge Open, 20 Gauge Hunter, 20 Gauge Open, 20 Gauge Ladies, and 20 Gauge JAKES (17 and Under)

All guns must chamber a 3” factory shell furnished by the shoot coordinator. Barrel length may not exceed 32”, including the choke tube. Optical sights are allowed in all classes. Shooters in the Hunter classes must use a commercially available choke tube. Shooters may not use any type of mechanical rest.

Hunter Class guns may not have any alterations to the barrel but may have commercially available recoil reducing devices and cheek pads or raised combs may be added as long as they are unaltered and commercially available.

The target is a 3” circle. Only pellets within the circle and not touching any line (clean targets) are scored.

Events:

Sanctioned Regional and State Still Target Shoots: These events are held all over the U.S. and are sanctioned by the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF)

The World Championship Still Target Shoot: Shooters may qualify for this event by winning or placing second in a Sanctioned Regional or State Still Target Shoot or by winning a squad in the qualifying rounds that precede the World Championship.

Shooters who qualify for the World Championship shoot in squads of 10, until they are winnowed down to the “final four” in each class. These 4 shooters compete until 1 shooter has won 2 squads. That shooter is the winner of that class and becomes the World Champion.

Any NWTF member may participate in any of these shoots.

For additional information or a complete set of rules for NWTF Sanctioned Still Target Shoot events, view the NWTF web site at the link below.

nwtf.org



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