Cart 0

The Dunning–Kruger Effect

Jack Wilson Marshall Dillon The Dunning–Kruger Effect

Recognizing our abilities or lack thereof is always the first step in taking positive action to increase our proficiency.

I watched as I'm sure many of you did the closed-circuit television coverage of the church shooting in Texas.  Mr. Jack Wilson shot the perpetrator from at least 15 yards, perhaps more, with his handgun, hit him one time and the perpetrator went down.

It would've been an impressive shot at any time but when a man is armed with a shotgun and has just shot two people, it becomes even more impressive.

Mr. Wilson was confident in his ability to end the confrontation. He demonstrated that with a single shot from his handgun.

Recognizing a threat for what it is and responding quickly to that threat is vital. Equally vital is knowing what our ability is to help end the threat.

If ending the threat meant using a handgun, would you have the confidence to fire the shot? Would that confidence be based upon time spent practicing or upon your perception of you ability? That's a tough question and one I ask myself  as well.

Range time with realistic targets at realistic distances is a place to start but only after you've spent time with your unloaded gun practicing the draw and presentation. Practice the draw, the presentation and dry fire until you can perform it seamlessly.

Lastly, all shooting skills are perishable skills. They must be a part of your routine as long as you carry your gun.

What is the "Dunning-Kruger" effect?

"The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their mistakes."

What is the meaning of "Metacognitive"?

Metacognition refers to one's awareness of and ability to regulate one's own thinking. Some everyday examples of metacognition include: awareness that you have difficulty remembering people's names in social situations. reminding yourself that you should try to remember the name of a person you just met.

The Problem:

"...Individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average."

The Cure:

"...awareness of and ability to regulate one's own thinking."

Recognizing our abilities or lack thereof is always the first step in taking positive action to increase our proficiency.

Practice, practice, practice...

 








Older Post Newer Post